Table 1

Experimental design for eliciting preferences towards race-based and place-based prioritisation for COVID-19 vaccines within priority groups

Currently, COVID-19 vaccines are generally only offered to priority populations, such as healthcare workers, essential workers, people with medical conditions, and older adults. From 19 April, vaccines will be offered in all US states to the general population. At that point, everyone who is not in a priority group, along with everyone who has not yet been vaccinated, will be eligible to get a vaccine. While there will be more vaccines, and relatively fewer people, it will still be the case that not everyone who would like a vaccine will be able to get one right away. There remain questions about how to allocate vaccines among the general population.
(Race frame)
Black, Indigenous and Hispanic communities have been hit harder by COVID-19. They experienced at least twice as many deaths compared with the white population. Deaths were most frequent for people who were economically disadvantaged in these groups.
Policy-makers are considering a plan to address these issues. They suggest that once vaccines are offered to the general population, economically disadvantaged members of black, Indigenous and Hispanic communities should be offered a larger share of vaccines so that they are able to get a vaccine sooner.
(Race&Racism frame- changes vs race-only frame in italics)
Because of structural racism, black, Indigenous and Hispanic communities have been hit harder by COVID-19. They experienced at least twice as many deaths compared with the white population. Deaths were most frequent for people who were economically disadvantaged in these groups.
Policy-makers are considering a plan to address these issues. They suggest that once vaccines are offered to the general population, economically disadvantaged members of black, Indigenous and Hispanic communities, who have been affected disproportionately by structural racism, should be offered a larger share of vaccines so that they are able to get a vaccine sooner.
(Place frame)
People living in economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods have been hit harder by COVID-19. They generally have less money, are more likely to live in crowded housing and are more frequently unemployed. While these people include all racial and ethnic groups, more Black, Indigenous, and Hispanic people live in disadvantaged neighbourhoods. These groups experienced at least twice as many deaths compared with the white population.
Policy-makers are considering a plan to address these issues. They suggest that once vaccines are offered to the general population, people living in more economically disadvantaged areas should be offered a larger share of vaccines so that they are able to get a vaccine sooner.
Q1. How much do you support or oppose this plan?
1=strongly oppose—5=strongly support
Q2. Under this plan, what percentage of the overall allotment of vaccines do you think should be set aside and added to the amounts that…
(Race frame) …economically disadvantaged members of black, Indigenous and Hispanic communitiesRace&racism frame] …economically disadvantaged members of Black, Indigenous, and Hispanic communities who have been affected disproportionately by structural racism…(Place frame) …people living in more economically disadvantaged areas…
…would otherwise be offered, based on their share of the population? w/o Anchor Experimental Condition: The following text occurred in only three of the six experimental conditions:
For your reference, a report by the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine suggested that 10% should be set aside for related purposes, and currently 13 US states do so, by reserving between 5% and 40%
If you think no additional allocations should be made, click the slider at 0.