eLetters

94 e-Letters

published between 2013 and 2016

  • Do Bioconservatives Really Have an "Untenable Ambiguity" Regarding Human Perfectibility?
    Jokim Schnoebbe
    For full disclosure, I should begin by saying that I read this paper because I am personally acquainted with one of the authors, Johann Roduit, with whom I had a brief exchange about the paper and who encouraged me to submit my few critical thoughts to this site. Also, I should say that I am not an expert in bioethics, but simply an interested layman.

    As a layman, I read the paper with pleasure. The thoughts were clearl...
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  • Re:"Ahsan v University Hospitals Leicester NHS Trust" does not legitimize antemortem organ preservation in end-of-life care.
    John Coggon

    I am grateful for the response to my paper.

    For clarity's sake, however, I would like to point out in reply that I do not cite Ahsan to 'legitimize' any claim. Rather I present it as legal authority for a claim about legal principle. The principle is clear, though the respondents to my paper seem not to understand it quite.

    I would therefore emphasise that the idea of best interests applies to patients...

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  • What's wrong about "what makes killing wrong?"
    Joshua C. Briscoe

    In a recent article by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Franklin G. Miller, the argument is made that ability should be the metric of value among human life and thus the determining factor on what constitutes moral harm when killing. Someone who has permanently lost all abilities no longer has value and killing them would not only fail to add more harm and it would also fail to take away any more value.

    In the author...

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  • "Ahsan v University Hospitals Leicester NHS Trust" does not legitimize antemortem organ preservation in end-of-life care.
    Mohamed Y Rady

    "Ahsan v University Hospitals Leicester NHS Trust" does not legitimize antemortem organ preservation in end-of-life care.

    Coggon cited Ahsan v University Hospitals Leicester NHS Trust to legitimize elective mechanical ventilation and preservation of organs in dying patients for transplantation [1]. Elective mechanical ventilation alone does not preserve organs in donors for transplantation without performing ad...

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