eLetters

470 e-Letters

  • Re: Patient organisations should also establish databanks on medical complications
    PJ Marang- van de Mheen

    Dear Editor

    Gebhardt in his brief report pleads for patient organisations to establish databanks on medical complications. Given the references (e.g. to a journalist article by Paans entitled “Medical errors to be kept secret”) and the lack of argumentation, there is substantial danger of misinterpretation of the current situation, which in turn may frustrate the process of increased transparency. We would therefore li...

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  • Drug companies and clinical trials
    Lin A Sharwood

    Dear Editor

    Arthur Schafer has a good point in regards to the commercialization of IP, but how can anyone agree with such a paranoid and polorazing view of the drug companies. Banning them completely would only create an underground of business transactions. At least with gifts to the Universities we know who and where the money is dispersed and for what.

    It is time the public became more involved in th...

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  • Canadian ethics review: worse than you think
    Ted Schrecker

    Dear Editor

    JME is to be congratulated for offering the important Olivieri Symposium free of charge on a pre-publication basis. The Olivieri and Healy affairs occurred at one university, in one province. Based on the articles by Arthur Schafer, Gordon DuVal, and Lorraine Ferris and colleagues, non-Canadian readers might underestimate the scope of the crisis confronting research ethics review in Canadian uni...

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  • In two minds
    Susanne McCabe (Stevens)

    Dear Editor

    Firstly, I have a great deal of admiration for this book, which provides much stimulating and thoughtful debate. As such, the book invites a certain amount of friendly criticism from a non-academic perspective.

    What is significantly missing is any inclusion of the 'service users' authentic voice or information for students on the...

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  • Conset to organ donation is a matter of life and not of death.
    Giorgina B Piccoli

    Dear Editor

    As a group of Nephrologists with a lively interest in ethical problems and involved in an educational campaign on dialysis and transplantation, we read with great pleasure the pragmatic and touching editorial of HE Emson;[1] as the senior of the group, I (GBP) had the occasion to watch the moment when the soul departs from the body; without the fear of being “unscientific”, I agree with Dr Emson that whe...

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  • An European Position on Public Autopsies
    Pierre J Sprumont

    Dear Editor

    The following statement was issued shortly after the performance of a "public autopsy" in London. It may consolidate your views, especially those on: "Expert" Witnesses: Did Von Hagens Act Professionally? It reflects the concern of those many professionals involved in medical dissections and investigations performed on human cadavers. The statement was sent to the Council of Europe, and it still is p...

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  • Too Much is Presumed in "Presumed Consent"?
    Michael Potts

    Dear Editor

    V. English and A. Sommerville [1] argue for a “limited version” of “presumed consent” for organ donation. They criticize the present law, which they claim presumes most people do not wish to donate, saying that:
    “It also seems somewhat bizarre that society assumes that most citizens are more likely to refuse than to help others, when there is no harm or benefit with either choice for th...

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  • Organs for donation, gift or right?
    Helen E Pilling

    Dear Editor

    This letter is in response to the article entitled “Non-heart beating organ donation: old procurement strategy – new ethical problems”

    I would like to start by saying that we are all too aware of the difficulties of dealing with the issues related to organ donation however I was rather surprised to read that certain healthcare professionals consider it appropriate to consider restricting access t...

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  • Organs, justice and human dignity
    Carmel Shalev

    Dear Editor

    I read with great interest the June 2003 issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics on human organs. The taboo on buying them is broken. Even if we use all the available cadavers, there will always be many more sick people in need. Organs save lives and the shortage is chronic, so why not pay for them if that’s what it takes?

    Janet Radcliffe-Richards suggests a free-for-all. That is, the freedom of...

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  • Using anaesthetised patients for medical students
    Elizabeth Cockerell

    Dear Editor

    A current matter under discussion in the BMJ is the use of patients conscious or anaesthetised patients for the instruction of medical students in pelvic and rectal (my apologies if one includes the other) examination - with no consent from the patient. There was no indication of whether children are used in this way. I do hope that this aspect of freely given, informed consent is examined in these pages....

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