eLetters

154 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • What you should have said
    Odhran P Shelley

    Dear Editor,

    As a surgeon my attention was caught by the opening question "What should we say to the man who has lost an arm in a farming accident", in Savelescu, Foddy and Rogers' article on the clinical ethics of "What should we say?" 1 Having read their article I believe the authors failed to address the practicality of ethical difficulties in this and other clinical scenarios.

    By introducing thei...

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  • End-of-life decisions in reversibly incompetent patients : autonomy vs "objective" best interest
    Marco Musi

    Dear Editor,

    The case of an adolescent with terminal respiratory failure, sedated and mechanically ventilated, raised the dilemma weather or not awaking him to make him aware of his impending death and permit him to exercise autonomous choices [1]. In the difficult task of weighing the various ethical arguments for or against, the healthcare team ultimately agreed with parents that it would be too distressing fo...

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  • Decisions to discontinue life-sustaining treatment
    David W Evans

    Dear Editor,

    Schaller and Kessler (J Med Ethics 2006;32:65-69) offer an admirable and most welcome account of the way in which these (regrettably common) decisions should be made, with due regard for the ethical as well as the clinical imperatives and free of pressure from those without direct responsibility for their patients.

    It is particularly pleasing to note their emphasis on the need for observati...

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  • Reasoned and reasonable approaches to ethics in undergraduate medical courses
    Adrian G. Sutton

    Dear Editor,

    Why is it that despite having many of the same concerns about how ethics may be included within undergraduate medical curricula, I write to state my concerns about Cowley's formulation and conclusions?

    I think my main problem is with an argument which starts from a position of criticising 'universalising' but offers as a substitute, the idealising of another universality - 'their own healthy i...

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  • Response to nursing persuasion to obtain consent
    Joseph R Haag

    Dear Editor,

    I read and reread this article, and was both very fascinated and greatly disturbed by it. I wholeheartedly agree that nurses should make every attempt to persuade a patient who is refusing a procedure they know to be in the best interests of the patient. There are times when the procedure being refused is absolutely necessary and must be done. It is my belief that nurses need to attempt to discover "wh...

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  • Without foundation
    Neville W Goodman

    Dear Editor,

    It is extraordinary that Rawlins and Dillon can open their paper with the accusation that Harris has 'no understanding of the quality adjusted life year'. I can only conclude that they did no background reading, other than reading Harris's editorial (1), before they wrote their response to him.

    One would also think, from reading Rawlins and Dillon, that there was no argument at all about QALYs,...

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  • What is an acceptable saleable body part?
    Laura Frei

    Dear Editor,

    I truly don't understand why a competent person is a felon for deciding to sell one of their own body parts to give potential life to another person. The lack of donors (supply) is well documented. Yet, I read on craigslist.org EVERY day in the job classifieds ad after ad for sperm donors ($600) and egg donors ($1500). I honestly don't get the difference. I know I cruised through quickly some of the a...

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  • Re: The dangers of medical ethics
    David J Brookman

    Dear Editor,

    I did enjoy this article for it canvassed much of the disquiet I have felt over the Four. The problem arises when the principles are extrapolated to being rules, like changing a dirt road to a railway line – the user is no longer permitted to leave the track. Regrettably much of medicine has been taught in this way, the principle of evidence based practice, which has always been present (its just that th...

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  • The new Italian law on assisted reproduction technology (Law 40/2004): A different view
    Andrea Dovio

    Dear Editor,

    Fineschi et al. have recently commented on the recent Italian law on assisted reproductive technology.[1] The Authors recognize that, with respect to the previous completely uncontrolled situation, the law represents a true step forward, by granting both better protection of the rights of the children born through ART and necessary control of ART centres. The Authors accurately describe the contents...

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  • The double standard for male and female suffering
    Michael Glass

    Dear Editors,

    Fox and Thomson found it "striking" that male and female genital cutting are treated so very differently in law. One explanation for this is that men are expected to endure pain whereas women should be sheltered and protected.

    Such an assertion is easy to dismiss as academic theorising. However, the effect of this cultural blindness can be demonstrated in the reports of the Sydney Morning H...

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