eLetters

145 e-Letters

published between 2004 and 2007

  • Reply to Paul Biegler
    Charles A Foster

    Dear Editor

    I am grateful to Dr Biegler for his response.[1]

    I do not think that Dr Biegler’s thesis demands any legally "counterintuitive claims". On the contrary, what he suggests seems in many ways to be intuitively right. His law is wrong, not his intuition. The law is sometimes counterintuitive (and downright unethical) in some situations in order to preserve principles which generally give just results....

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  • Deaf Children - A Response to Foddy
    Neil Levy

    Dear Editor

    Bennett Foddy interprets the view I express in 'Deafness, culture, and choice' (JME 2002: 28) correctly: deaf children are contingently, and not necessarily, worse off as a result of their disability. Indeed, this claims seems almost tautological: to be better or worse off is inherently relational, so it is easy to imagine worlds in which the deaf would not be worse off. A world in which everyone was de...

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  • Re: Patient consent to DNR orders: some legal observations
    Paul Biegler

    Dear Editor

    I thank Mr Foster for his response.[1]

    If I understand him correctly he advances three claims. Firstly, he suggests that the question of consent might not be a relevant consideration in relation to DNR orders if the treating doctor is able to “wash his (or her) hands” of a duty of care to the patient. Secondly, he suggests that in the case of a competent patient the best interests criterion d...

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  • Consent in 'an ethical market in human organs'
    Jeffrey D Tee

    Dear Editor

    Erin and Harris [1] suggest that we need a regulated market in live donor organs to make good the shortfall in organs available for transplantation. However, the example of the third world shows that to sell a kidney is virtually always an act of desperation when other options for raising money are exhausted, for example Goyal et al.[2] reported that 96% of participants in their survey of kidney...

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  • Why not?
    A David Melton

    Dear Editor

    Everyone makes money or dare I say a profit from "traditional" organ transplatation through out the world, except the donor. What happened to supply and demand and free markets? Ultimately it's my body and if I can help someone prolong their life and not have a high risk to mine and make something to cover my time and expense..why not?

    I'm a healthy mid-40 professional, that does not smoke. Hey s...

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