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Prepared for practice? UK Foundation doctors’ confidence in dealing with ethical issues in the workplace
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  • Published on:
    A LESSON TO BE LEARNT? HOW THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC COULD HAVE A POSITIVE IMPACT ON JUNIOR DOCTORS’ ETHICAL DECISION-MAKING.
    • Katherine Parker, Medical Student Bristol Medical School, Bristol, United Kingdom
    • Other Contributors:
      • Joseph Ziegler, Foundation (Y1) Doctor

    We were interested to read Corfield et al’s recent article on Foundation doctors’ confidence in dealing with ethical issues in the workplace(1), which felt particularly relevant to us – a fourth-year medical student and a Foundation doctor. The importance of medical law and ethics (MEL) has been emphasised by the current COVID-19 pandemic. Difficult decisions with complex ethical implications have had to be made at both clinical and managerial levels across the health service.

    Suddenly, junior doctors’ preparedness to deal with ethical dilemmas is framed in a new light. We took particular note of Corfield et al’s concluding remark which highlights the need for a supportive environment which fosters liberal discussion of ethical queries(1). It is well documented that the presence of rigid hierarchies within the clinical environment can deter junior doctors from raising uncertainties(2-4), a phenomenon likely to extend to those of an ethical nature.

    The COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented challenge for medics regardless of their level of seniority, which has engendered a feeling of common endeavour with far-reaching consequences for practice. Interestingly, discussions with colleagues have echoed our perception that these changes have precipitated a less pronounced sense of hierarchy. This in turn has the potential to facilitate more open discussion of ethical issues including those generated by the crisis. In relation to the authors’ findings(1),...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.