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Towards responsible ejaculations: the moral imperative for male contraceptive responsibility
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    Complicating Condom Use in Casual Sex Encounters
    • Temitope Fisayo, Medical Student London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

    Dear editor,

    Shahvisi offers cogent arguments for men taking primary responsibility for unwanted pregnancy (1). I do not, in this letter, aim to argue against her conclusion. However, when discussing potential counterarguments to this position, she mentions that it is claimed that perhaps women would not trust men to use long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs). Shahvisi does well to point out the relevant data that reveals women in longer term relationships would, in fact, trust their partners to use LARCs (2,3). Yet in discussions of casual sexual encounters, she merely asserts that ‘barrier methods are in any case preferable’(1).

    I argue this is not trivially the case. The use of barrier methods is highly inconsistent, particularly in casual sex (4–8). Despite their role in preventing both sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unwanted pregnancy, I would argue that this data shows that people’s condom preferences are not so clear cut. Preference for condom use is heterogenous and is tied to desires more abstract than seeking to prevent pregnancy, such as the desire to feel masculine or ‘clean’ (8). Additionally, condoms, the most popular barrier method, are 86% effective at preventing unwanted pregnancy in typical use (9). LARCs are more than 99% effective (10).

    It is my view that defeating the argument that women would not trust men to use LARCs in casual sexual relations thus needs more work. One argument might be that, in a world where...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.