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Confused out of care: unanticipated consequences of a ‘Hostile Environment’
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    In response to: Confused out of care: unanticipated consequences of a ‘Hostile Environment’
    • Piotr Szawarski, Consultant in Intensive Care Medicine Wexham Park Hospital, Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust

    Glennerster and Hodson should be congratulated on their paper tackling a very important and sensitive issue (1). They have performed a thorough analysis of legal landscape with its consequences. I feel however, that their analysis of ethical implications is lacking. Also, doctors unintentionally become second victims in this paper, appearing as those who do not care.

    The United Kingdom is sadly not the only state that chose to pursue a “hostile environment” policy directed towards refugees and other migrants. Readers may recall the recent story of the Spanish humanitarian ship Open Arms who having rescued migrants in the Mediterranean Sea was denied entry into Malta and Italy (2). The rescue ships face fines of one million euros if they enter Italian coastal waters without prior permission under new legislation. Another sad example comes from Hungary, famous for building a fence along its border to keep out refugees and the toxic “Stop Soros” bill (3). A created hostility is not only a threat to life and health, but also a threat to our humanity. By ignoring vulnerability of refugees well described by the 1951 Convention (4), of which incidentally the UK is a signatory, we collectively threaten the very concept of dignity inherent in our humanity. A Polish writer and philosopher Stanisław Lem, once reflected on the roots of Holocaust perpetrated by the Nazi regime (5). He asserted that there occurred a complete reversal of moral compass for the German society. Cle...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.