Article Text

Download PDFPDF

Ethics
Nursing in asylum seeker detention in Australia: care, rights and witnessing
  1. D Zion1,
  2. L Briskman2,
  3. B Loff1
  1. 1
    Human Rights and Bioethics Unit, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 89 Commercial Road, Melbourne 3004, Victoria, Australia
  2. 2
    Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Deborah Zion, Human Rights and Bioethics Unit, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Australia; Deborah.zion{at}med.monash.edu.au

Abstract

The system of asylum seeker detention in Australia is one in which those seeking refuge are stripped of many of their rights, including the right to health. This presents serious ethical problems for healthcare providers working within this system. In this article we describe asylum seeker detention and analyse the role of nurses. We discuss how far an “ethics of care” and witnessing the suffering of asylum seekers can serve to improve their situation and improve ethical nursing practice.

View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Funding The project has been funded by the Australian Research Council.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Provenance and Peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles

  • The concise argument
    Søren Holm