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An ethical market in human organs
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  • Published on:
    Consent in 'an ethical market in human organs'

    Dear Editor

    Erin and Harris [1] suggest that we need a regulated market in live donor organs to make good the shortfall in organs available for transplantation. However, the example of the third world shows that to sell a kidney is virtually always an act of desperation when other options for raising money are exhausted, for example Goyal et al.[2] reported that 96% of participants in their survey of kidney...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Why not?

    Dear Editor

    Everyone makes money or dare I say a profit from "traditional" organ transplatation through out the world, except the donor. What happened to supply and demand and free markets? Ultimately it's my body and if I can help someone prolong their life and not have a high risk to mine and make something to cover my time and expense..why not?

    I'm a healthy mid-40 professional, that does not smoke. Hey s...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Human organs and markets
    • Tom Koch, Bioethicist, Medical Geographer
    • Other Contributors:
      • Simon Fraser University

    Dear Editor

    Erin and Harris argue, as have others before them, for a regulated market in human organs. The rationale is the imbalance between a limited supply and growing demand for organs. Given that fact, and no others, it makes "sense" to create a market that might increase supply.

    The assumption of those who have argued this is that there are neither risks nor dangers to donation and that the act of don...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Organs, justice and human dignity

    Dear Editor

    I read with great interest the June 2003 issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics on human organs. The taboo on buying them is broken. Even if we use all the available cadavers, there will always be many more sick people in need. Organs save lives and the shortage is chronic, so why not pay for them if that’s what it takes?

    Janet Radcliffe-Richards suggests a free-for-all. That is, the freedom of...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.