Responses

PDF

Ethics and innovation in medicine
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    Ethical innovation from the roots- a response to Ethics and innovation in medicine

    Innovation is derived from the Latin innovatus which means “to renew or change”. In the broadest sense of the term, it can be viewed as the stimulus that modifies existing processes. Further, innovation has been one of the driving forces in the evolution of society through various revolutionary periods. This concept incorporates connotations of invention and creativity as impulses in themselves, however has recently been applied to commercialised settings. Hence, despite scientific interests, civic duties and altruism providing motivation for innovation, the strongest motive in recent times seems to be with a view to increasing profit. From a bottom-up level, inexperienced and junior innovators with the former inclinations could be met with resistance from the complexity of deriving economic viability. Furthermore, a central component to successful innovation involves promoting a culture to challenge outdated norms and the status quo. Change cannot occur if it is believed that present methods are infallible, as this removes the impetus for a goal-driven action. Consequently, many ideas may not reach fruition. However, within the medical field, it is wise that innovation occurs with incremental and calculated adjustments by enlarge, rather than with abrupt renovations. Wherever innovation leads to novel technology, the ultimate outcome of such is unforeseeable. The collingridge dilemma highlights an important notion that in early stages a new technology is still open to soc...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.