eLetters

416 e-Letters

  • To discuss or not to discuss CPR? That is the question
    Rajeena Ackroyd

    Dear Editor

    I read with interst the article by Cherniack [1] in October's issue. He questions whether or not more elderly people die with a DNR order beccause they are actually choosing to do so, and reviews evidence of doctors and patients knowledge and attitudes towards CPR decision making.

    It is all very well talking about whether a patient would want to be resuscitated and Cherniack feels more studies...

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  • Life imitates art
    John M. Freeman

    Dear Editor

    The discussion of this couples desire to have a deaf child is very reminiscent of a case we invented, published in Tough Decisions: Cases in Medical Ethics 2nd ed. Freeman J and McDonnell K Oxford Press 2001. The case explored the genetic issues in the desire of a deaf couple to have a deaf child. Most genetic manipulations are to avoid a genetic disorder, this, and the lesbian couple show that genet...

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  • DNA orders
    Andrew D Lawson

    Dear Editor

    I read Dr Cherniack's article regarding DNR orders with interest.[1] One of the problems with DNR orders is the patients’ assumption that if there is no DNR order they will survive resuscitative efforts. This of course is far from the truth. In my hospital these have been modified to "do not attempt to resuscitate orders". One cannot be truly autonomous without being informed. Long term survival, as measu...

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  • Editor's response: A call for rules of engagement
    Julian Savulescu

    Dr Lewis raises the important issue of what the rules of debate should be in electronic correspondence.[1]

    As an editor, I feel as if I am caught in the maelstrom of evolution. The web has radically changed the nature of debate and the presentation of information and knowledge. It is not clear to me how and whether it should be controlled. My general approach has been to let the experiment run in a free way and look...

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  • A call for rules of engagement
    Wayne Lewis

    Dear Editor

    At the time of writing there appears to have been no electronic submissions to the Journal of Medical Ethics. It seems appropriate, therefore, to begin electronic correspondence with a consideration of some of the ethical implications of this new form of ethical dialogue.

    I have posted this response to Kenneth Boyd’s editorial on ‘Mrs. Pretty and Ms B’ [1] as this article may provoke debate...

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  • HIV transmission in crime? A Brazilian point of view
    Celio Levyman

    Dear Editor

    The basic principles of law applied in Brazil follow the Roman Right. The medical ethics and bioethics approach generally implies that doctors must respect patient confidentiality, even in a potentially risky situation, where, for example, someone with HIV does not tell his/her partner and the physician is aware of the patient's infection. Some have attempted to prosecute those who knowingly transmit HIV, b...

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  • Defending double effect
    Philip Pearson

    Dear Editor

    Dr Shaw makes some interesting points in discussing the doctrine of double effect.[1] However, I am unsure as to the validity of his conclusions. He states that the doctrine "permuits the use of drugs which relieve the distress of dying, evene when they hasten death." However, if opiates are in mind here, then the dose could and should be closely monitored - up or down - to fully palliate pain. They do...

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  • Importance of getting the facts right reconfirmed!
    Søren Holm

    Dear Editor

    The authors should be congratulated with this paper which again shows how important it is to get ones facts right, before passing ethical judgement.

  • American capitalism at its best
    John Smelcer

    Dear Editor

    Water used to be free. More than two-thirds of the planet is covered with water. Yet, American consumers (particularly) pay more for a bottle of water than they do for a soda, a bottle of juice, or even a beer (and yet all of these products are 90 % or more water in the first place). Cars cost more nowadays than a house did on twenty years ago. I remember going to see Star Wars (1977) for only about $...

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  • Re: Bad behaviour does not equal research fraud
    David Geggie
    Dear Editor,

    Professor Williamson makes a valid point about the term "research fraud" and I agree that the term covers a number of different categories of unethical behaviour. I also pointed out that "Research fraud can take many forms" in the discussion section of my paper. For the purposes of my article I stated that consultants who had answered "Yes" to questions 1,2 or 3 of table 1 had reported "observed misconduct" and...

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