Article Text

PDF
Paper
So not mothers: responsibility for surrogate orphans
  1. Jennifer A Parks1,
  2. Timothy F Murphy2
  1. 1Department of Philosophy, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  2. 2Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Timothy F Murphy, Department of Medical Education, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago IL 60612-7309, USA; tmurphy{at}uic.edu

Abstract

The law ordinarily recognises the woman who gives birth as the mother of a child, but in certain jurisdictions, it will recognise the commissioning couple as the legal parents of a child born to a commercial surrogate. Some commissioning parents have, however, effectively abandoned the children they commission, and in such cases, commercial surrogates may find themselves facing unexpected maternal responsibility for children they had fully intended to give up. Any assumption that commercial surrogates ought to assume maternal responsibility for abandoned children runs contrary to the moral suppositions that typically govern contract surrogacy, in particular, assumptions that gestational carriers are not ‘mothers’ in any morally significant sense. In general, commercial gestational surrogates are almost entirely conceptualised as ‘vessels’. In a moral sense, it is deeply inconsistent to expect commercial surrogates to assume maternal responsibility simply because commissioning parents abandon children for one reason or another. We identify several instances of child abandonment and discuss their implications with regard to the moral conceptualisation of commercial gestational surrogates. We conclude that if gestational surrogates are to remain conceptualised as mere vessels, they should not be expected to assume responsibility for children abandoned by commissioning parents, not even the limited responsibility of giving them up for adoption or surrendering them to the state.

  • children
  • ethics
  • reproductive medicine

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Contributors Both authors are equally responsible for the design and writing of this text.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.