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Freedom of Information Act: scalpel or just a sharp knife?
  1. Simon P Hammond1,
  2. Jane L Cross2,
  3. Fiona M Poland2,
  4. Martyn Patel3,
  5. Bridget Penhale2,
  6. Toby O Smith2,
  7. Chris Fox1
  1. 1Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Clinical Psychology, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK
  2. 2Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK
  3. 3Older Peoples Medicine Department, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Simon P Hammond, Department of Clinical Psychology, Norwich Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK; S.Hammond{at}uea.ac.uk

Abstract

The concluding statement of the Burns Commission, established to evaluate whether changes are needed to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), ruled no major legislative changes were required. As such Freedom of Information (FOI) legislation still enables anyone to obtain information from public authorities. In this brief report article we explore arguments regarding FOI as an instrument for healthcare research using an international research programme as a case study.

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