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Treatment-resistant major depressive disorder and assisted dying
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  • Published on:
    Patients with psychosis should not be disqualified from assisted dying on grounds of mental incompetence.

    Dear Editor.

    Schuklenk and van der Vathorst's feature paper articulates powerful and persuasive arguments to the effect that denying patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) assistance in dying results in unnecessary suffering and amounts to unfair discrimination against TRD patients.

    Beyond TRD, the same arguments can readily (and in my view appropriately) be used to support assisted dying...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Depression is not the only treatment-resistant psychiatric condition.

    Dear Editor. I do occasional psychiatric assessments for people contemplating medically-assisted rational suicide (MARS) in Switzerland and broadly agree with Schuklenk and van der Vathorst's arguments. Usually, my role is limited to assessing mental capacity and excluding the existence of a treatable psychiatric condition that might be influencing the patient's decision to include MARS in the list of acceptable options....

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.