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Clinical ethics ward rounds: building on the core curriculum
  1. Lisa Parker1,
  2. Lisa Watts2,
  3. Helen Scicluna3
  1. 1School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  2. 2Rural Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  3. 3Medicine Education and Student Office, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Lisa Parker, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia; lisa.parker{at}unsw.edu.au

Abstract

The clinical years of medical student education are an ideal time for students to practise and refine ethical thinking and behaviour. We piloted a new clinical ethics teaching activity this year with undergraduate medical students within the Rural Clinical School at the University of New South Wales. We used a modified teaching ward round model, with students bringing deidentified cases of ethical interest for round-table discussion. We found that students were more engaged in the subject of clinical ethics after attending the teaching sessions and particularly appreciated having structured time to listen to and learn from their peers. Despite this, we found no change in student involvement in managing or planning action in situations that they find ethically challenging. A key challenge for educators in clinical ethics is to address the barriers that prevent students taking action.

  • Clinical ethics
  • education for healthcare professionals
  • education/
  • allocation of organs/tissues, history of health ethics/bioethics
  • informed consent
  • codes of/position statements on professional ethics
  • professional misconduct
  • education

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Footnotes

  • Funding Internal Learning and Teaching Seed Grant Fund at the University of New South Wales.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval Human Research Ethics Advisory Panel, Medical/Community, of the University of New South Wales.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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