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Healthcare providers’ knowledge and attitudes about rapid tissue donation (RTD): phase one of establishing a rapid tissue donation programme in thoracic oncology
  1. Matthew B Schabath1,2,
  2. Jessica McIntyre3,
  3. Christie Pratt4,
  4. Luis E Gonzalez3,
  5. Teresita Munoz-Antonia2,4,
  6. Eric B Haura2,4,
  7. Gwendolyn P Quinn2,3
  1. 1Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA
  2. 2Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida, College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida, USA
  3. 3Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA
  4. 4Thoracic Oncology Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Gwendolyn P Quinn, Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Gwen.quinn{at}moffitt.org

Abstract

In preparation for the development of a rapid tissue donation (RTD) programme, we surveyed healthcare providers (HCPs) in our institution about knowledge and attitudes related to RTD with lung cancer patients. A 31-item web based survey was developed collecting data on demographics, knowledge and attitudes about RTD. The survey contained three items measuring participants’ knowledge about RTD, five items assessing attitudes towards RTD recruitment and six items assessing HCPs’ level of agreement with factors influencing decisions to discuss RTD. Response options were presented on a 5-point Likert scale. Ninety-one HCPs participated in the study. 66% indicated they had never heard of RTD prior to the survey, 78% rated knowledge of RTD as none or limited and 95.6% reported not having ethical or religious concerns about discussing RTD with patients. The majority were either not comfortable (17.8%) or not sure if they felt comfortable discussing RTD with cancer patients (42.2%). 56.1% indicated their knowledge of RTD would play an integral role in their decision to discuss RTD with patients. 71.4% reported concerns with RTD discussion and the emotional state of the patient. Physicians and nurses play an important role in initiating conversations about recruitment and donation to research that can ultimately influence uptake. Increasing HCP knowledge about RTD is a necessary step towards building an RTD programme. Our study provides important information about characteristics associated with low levels of knowledge and practice related to RTD where additional education and training may be warranted.

  • Donation/Procurement of Organs/Tissues
  • Health Personnel

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