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Forensic DNA databases: genetic testing as a societal choice
  1. Annemie Patyn,
  2. Kris Dierickx
  1. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Biomedical Ethics and Law, Leuven, Belgium
  1. Correspondence to Professor Dr Kris Dierickx, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Biomedical Ethics and Law, Kapucijnenvoer 35d bus 7001, Leuven 3000, Belgium; kris.dierickx{at}med.kuleuven.be

Abstract

In this brief report, the authors argue that while a lot of concerns about forensic DNA databases have been raised using arguments from biomedical ethics, these databases are used in a complete different context from other biomedical tools. Because they are used in the struggle against crime, the decision to create or store a genetic profile cannot be left to the individual. Instead, this decision is made by officials of a society. These decisions have to be based on a policy that is the concretisation of some of society's most fundamental ideas about its own nature and function. Individuals wanting to influence these decisions have to try to influence this policy, within the bounds of a state's own self-concept. This article is an attempt to reorient the discussion about forensic DNA databases from a biomedical debate to a more political–philosophical one.

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Footnotes

  • Funding The writing of this report was funded by GeneBanC, an EU-FP6 supported STREP contract number 036751.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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